Monthly Archives: December 2015

What Is the Future of Higher Education?

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby featherTerrific Atlantic article by ALIA WONG, ADRIENNE GREEN, AND LI ZHOU http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/12/hope-despair-higher-education/421803/
Matt Rourke / AP / Zak Bickel / The Atlantic
Matt Rourke / AP / Zak Bickel / The Atlantic
William Deresiewicz, writer and author of Excellent Sheep weights in-- Reason for despair: The continued dominance of a narrowly “practical” approach at all levels. This is the attitude that says that the exclusive purpose of education is to prepare workers for the labor force. It shows up, among other places, in the overwhelming focus on math and reading in K-12 and the fetishization of STEM fields and universal disparagement of the liberal arts in college. It also underlies the continuing privatization of public education through the promotion of charter schools and other aspects of the “reform” agenda as well as the ongoing defunding of state universities—the idea being that if education serves the purposes of the market, it should be under the control of the market. Reason for hope: The gathering resistance to this mentality, which I see in the movement for tuition-free, or at least debt-free, public higher education; in the opposition to high-stakes testing in K-12, which has led to the repeal and replacement of No Child Left Behind; and in the proliferation of new alternative educational models. Students (and their parents) are getting tired of being treated like revenue streams and exploitable resources. But whether we will gather sufficient political strength to oust the entrenched interests on the other side is still a very open question.

Stellar article in NYT: Dear Architects: Sound Matters By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby featherVery important article by a Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/12/29/arts/design/sound-architecture.html?src=trending&module=Ribbon&version=context®ion=Header&action=click&contentCollection=Trending&pgtype=article Interactive article produced by ALICIA DeSANTIS, JON HUANG and GRAHAM ROBERTS. Interesting sound features (need headphones or earbuds).

Universities Race to Nurture Start-Up Founders of the Future

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby featherBy NATASHA SINGER DEC. 28, 2015 http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/29/technology/universities-race-to-nurture-start-up-founders-of-the-future.html?emc=edit_tu_20151229&nl=bits&nlid=23085166&_r=0
Students at a 3 Day Startup event put on by Rice University and the University of Houston in October. Credit Spike Johnson for The New York Times
Students at a 3 Day Startup event put on by Rice University and the University of Houston in October. Credit Spike Johnson for The New York Times
Hesam Panahi, founder of the University of Houston's start-up accelerator, teaches students entrepreneurship skills at the start-up training event in Houston. Credit Spike Johnson for The New York Times
Hesam Panahi, founder of the University of Houston's start-up accelerator, teaches students entrepreneurship skills at the start-up training event in Houston. Credit Spike Johnson for The New York Times
The entrepreneurs’ lab at N.Y.U. was financed by a multimillion-dollar gift from Mark Leslie, the founder of Veritas Software, and his wife, Debra. Credit Ángel Franco/The New York Times
The entrepreneurs’ lab at N.Y.U. was financed by a multimillion-dollar gift from Mark Leslie, the founder of Veritas Software, and his wife, Debra. Credit Ángel Franco/The New York Times

Running into a former Drake student at Midwest

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby featherThe Midwest International Clinic in Chicago was great opportunity for recruiting students, meeting educators, visiting arts schools--and networking. In August, 1975, I started my first teaching job at Drake University in Des Moines (1975-83). It was the perfect job in so many ways. I was 22 years-old (about to turn 23) and there were so many wonderful students and faculty colleagues. Jerry Tolson was an upper classman and someone who I admired as a musician, educator and professional (yes, as a student he was a leader and held himself in a mature way--beyond his years). He's on the faculty at the University of Louisville (lucky them) and it was great to see him again. 12400072_10153807843011672_1922542291_o

My holiday gift! Writings about ambiguity/uncertainty, planning and entrepreneurship

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby featherStop Making Plans: How Goal-Setting Limits Rather Than Begets Our Happiness and Success This is a short read by Maria Popova from her brain pickings blog. https://www.brainpickings.org/2014/02/05/oliver-burkeman-antidote-plans-uncertainty/ I hear a lot about how focus, discipline, single-mindedness, planning, goals, objectives and org charts will solve everything....... Will they really? quote-uncertainty-is-where-things-happen-it-is-where-the-opportunities-for-success-for-happiness-oliver-burkeman-79-81-41

Buddy Guy to be featured in Leadbelly Tribute Concert in Carnegie Hall

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby featherhttp://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/12/18/lead-belly-tribute-concert-carnegie-hall/?ref=music One of the things I am most proud of (from my time at LSU (2009-2014) was authoring the large document that requested awarding an honorary doctorate to blues legend Buddy Guy: I would like to nominate George “Buddy” Guy for a long-overdue honorary Doctorate from the LSU School of Music within the College of Music & Dramatic Arts. Having recently become aware that this internationally renowned and influential musician once served as an LSU employee, it seems only fitting that he be honored at the May 2013 commencement ceremony. Having worked in what eventually became known as the Office of Facility Services from 1955-57, Mr. Guy went on to become a six-time Grammy Award winning blues guitarist, influencing generations of musicians. He is just the type of distinguished musician that the School of Music would be proud to award with this high academic honor. Born to a sharecropper family in Lettsworth, La., Buddy Guy worked at LSU during a period that he would not have been allowed to attend the university as a student due to legalized racial segregation at that time. Yet, he has fond memories of his time as an employee, even saying in an interview that when he left in 1958 to pursue a musical career in Chicago, his supervisor told him that he would always have a job here if his musical career didn’t pan out. But, “pan out” it did as Mr. Guy quickly established himself as one of Chicago’s greatest bluesmen and a hero to multiple generations of guitarists such as Eric Clapton, who inducted Guy into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2005 along with B.B. King, to John Mayer. Guy has earned multiple honors throughout his decades in music. In 2008, he was named to the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame. In December 2012, he received the Kennedy Center honor along with Academy Award winner Dustin Hoffman, Emmy Award winner David Letterman, and the iconic musical group Led Zepplin.
Blues great Buddy Guy, left, reacts as he is given a LSU-themed guitar from LSU President and Chancellor F. King Alexander, right, during LSU's spring commencement ceremony on Thursday, May 15, 2014. Guy, who worked for LSU's facility services department from 1955 to 1958, was awarded a honorary doctorate degree for his musical career. (Photo by Brianna Paciorka, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Blues great Buddy Guy, left, reacts as he is given a LSU-themed guitar from LSU President and Chancellor F. King Alexander, right, during LSU's spring commencement ceremony on Thursday, May 15, 2014. Guy, who worked for LSU's facility services department from 1955 to 1958, was awarded a honorary doctorate degree for his musical career. (Photo by Brianna Paciorka, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)